WAYS TO RESPECT YOUR STUDENTS

Students need respect, too!  The following list from Resetting Respect offers some suggestions for all those who work with students.

 unnamedWays to Respect Your Students

1) Listen carefully to each student.

2) Give appropriate and helpful feedback.

3) Be clear about and give frequent reminders of expectations.

4) Be clear, fair and consistent about consequences.

5) Don’t compare students to their siblings or make frequent references to them.

6) Recognize the attention spans and activity levels of your students and design the day accordingly.

7) Avoid demeaning or humiliating any student either in front of the class or in one-on-one situations.

8) Avoid using sarcasm with students. They frequently won’t understand it and will be further confused by it.

9) Allow students to participate in establishing classroom guidelines.

10) Find out what the students want to learn, and incorporate as much of that as possible into the curriculum.

11) Present new material a variety of ways that address different learning styles, providing an opportunity for all students to learn the new content.

12) Create an atmosphere that encourages the students to share their problems and concerns with you, and then strategize with the students to address those issues.

 

Note to Communities, School Administrations and School Boards: For students to feel respected and to understand that you consider their education valuable and important, as well as for them to be able to learn, schools themselves must be safe, clean, and in good repair.

WAYS TO RESPECT YOUR TEACHER

In honor of the new school year, here is an excerpt from my book, Resetting Respect, that offers some things for students of all ages to think about.images

Ways to Respect Your Teacher

1) Try to give the teacher your full attention.

2) Follow the classroom rules and guidelines.

3) Use good manners with your teacher.

4) Do your best to get to school and class on time.

5) Let your teacher know if you don’t understand something or have a concern or a problem.

6) Keep your hands to yourself in the classroom and on the playground.

7) Try not to disturb the other students.

8) Do the assigned work to the best of your ability and on time.

9) Participate enthusiastically in classroom activities.

10) Offer to help the teacher when you notice something that needs doing.

 

Note to Parents: For a classroom to be successful, teachers need to respect the students and students need to respect the teachers. Therefore it is imperative that you model respect for teachers at home. If your kids think you don’t respect their teachers, it is likely they won’t respect their teachers either.

RESPECT ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL: GOP DEBATE, AUG 6

I must admit that while I was watching the first 2016 GOP debate live, I was focusing on my “sense of” the candidates, appraising their tactics, and musing on the intentions of the journalists.  It was when I recently watched the debate a second time (and I will admit I didn’t get to see it all), that I noticed some respect takeaways:

“We need to stop worrying about being loved and start worrying about being respected,” opined Governor Chris Christie about international relations.

“We need to give everybody the chance, treat everybody with respect and let them share in this great American dream that we have,” Governor John Kasich said, after having offered that while he does not agree with same-sex marriage, the court has ruled and he accepts it.

And Donald Trump.  He seems to confuse political correctness with respect and civility, and lowers the bar on behavior to the detriment of us all.  A more respectful Trump could help us know his policy positions rather than leaving us simply to respond, positively or negatively, to his style. A more respectful Trump might inspire the picture of a more presidential Trump rather than the bombastic incident-inciter he currently seems.  A more respectful Trump might help us decide whether his campaign is truly for real or just for his own amusement and gratification.

 

KEEPING TRACK OF RESPECT ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL

This post may be the first use of the word “respect” I’ve seen by a 2016 presidential candidate.  Let’s keep track — let me know if you’ve seen or see other instances of the word or respectful behavior, regardless of political affiliation!

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) said on Sunday that he does not always see eye to eye with Democratic presidential frontrunner Hillary Clinton.

“She and I disagree on many issues,” Sanders, himself a 2016 White House hopeful, said of Clinton on ABC’s “This Week.”

“I have a lot of respect for Hillary Clinton,” he told host Jonathan Karl. “She is somebody I’ve known for 25 years.”

“I’m not going to be engaging in personal attacks against her,” Sanders added.

“The American people want a serious debate about serious issues, not personal attacks.”